Skip navigation and jump to content
Welcome to Ireland's Youth Information Website
Follow us
Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Snapchat

Accessibility Options

High Contrast Text Size

Facts about alcohol

Aka booze, beer, wine, spirits, liquors


Written by SpunOut | View this authors Twitter page and posted in health


Share this article -

What is it?

One of the most commonly used drugs of them all, alcoholic drinks consist chiefly of water and ethanol (ethylalcohol). Fermenting fruits, vegetables and grain produce alcohol. It is found in drinks like beer, lager, wine, alco pops, cider, and spirits such as whiskey or gin. Alcoholic drinks range in strength and are measured as a percentage (%) per volume, the higher the percentage, the stronger the effects are.

The effects of alcohol

  • In moderate amounts, alcohol results in light headedness, loss of inhibitions and changes in mood, including feeling of relaxation, and becoming more talkative. It is also known to increase sexual desire.
  • The more alcohol consumed the stronger these effects are and users can quickly become nauseated, aggressive, sexually promiscuous, depressed, hyperactive and experience unpredictable mood swings.
  • Speech, vision and physical co-ordination are also affected.
  • Alcohol and sex don’t always mix. This can be not enjoying or even remembering the sex or not being able to get an erection. If you are planning to have sex then it’s best to stay sober so that you can get the most out of the night!
  • Being drunk can also lead you to take greater personal safety risks, such as having unprotected sex, being at risk of spiked drinks or drug rape, or drunk driving. If you are going to drink, find out how to lower the risk of drinking here.
  • The intensity of the effects depends on the strength of the alcoholic drink, plus the rate and amount consumed. Other factors that influence the effects of alcohol include the weight of the drinker, their mood, surroundings and how recently they ate.

Risks of drinking

  • Alcohol is a depressant drug. If you're feeling down, it will make you feel worse. A regular, long term drinking habit can lead to physical as well as psychological dependency.
  • Tolerance can develop, which means you need more to get the same effect.
  • Long term heavy drinking habits may cause serious damage to internal organs including heart, stomach and liver. Heavy drinkers can also have impotence and fertility problems.
  • Heavy drinking can cause skin problems, trembling (the shakes), obesity, brain damage, mood swings and personality changes. Getting very drunk can lead to loss of consciousness and death particularly among those who are not used to drinking.
  • Excessive consumption can also lead to alcohol poisoning and this can kill.
  • Find out more about the effects and risks of alcohol.
  • Calculate how many units in a drink using this online calculator.

The law

  • It is against the law for a young person under 18 to buy alcohol or drink alcohol in a public place.
  • It is illegal for anyone over the age of 18 to supply or buy alcohol for someone who is under 18.
  • It is an offence to sell alcohol to a person under 18 either on or off the premises by either a license holder or any individual.
  • It is an offence to drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  • Safety experts advise people do not drink at all if they are going to drive.
Share this article -

Published February 26th, 2013
Last updated October 23rd, 2017
Tags drink alcohol addiction
Can this be improved? Contact editor@spunout.ie if you have any suggestions for this article.

Need more information?

Request to speak with a youth worker in your area over the phone, by email or text. They may be able to assist you by providing further information specific to your needs.

Youth Work Ireland - Crosscare - YMCA

Contact via: Phone E-mail Text
By clicking submit you agree to our terms and conditions. ​Please note that this service is run by Youth Work Ireland and Crosscare​.​ E​nquiries are not handled by SpunOut.ie directly.
Jump to related articles
Was this article helpful?