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Quiz: How much do you know about alcohol?

Test yourself and see how much you know about alcohol.


Written by SpunOut | View this authors Twitter page and posted in health


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Q1. What is a standard drink?

Correct

All of the above count as one standard drink. In Ireland a standard drink has about 10 grams of pure alcohol in it. In the UK a standard drink, also called a unit of alcohol, has about 8 grams of pure alcohol.

Learn more about standard drinks here.

Incorrect

All of the above count as one standard drink. In Ireland a standard drink has about 10 grams of pure alcohol in it. In the UK a standard drink, also called a unit of alcohol, has about 8 grams of pure alcohol.

Learn more about standard drinks here.

Q2. What is the weekly low risk limit for alcohol consumption?

Correct

While there is no safe level of alcohol consumption the low risk weekly guidelines for adults are up to 11 standard drinks in a week for women and up to 17 standard drinks in a week for men. Drinks should be spaced out over the week, with two to three alcohol free days per week.

Learn more about low-risk alcohol limits here.

Incorrect

While there is no safe level of alcohol consumption the low risk weekly guidelines for adults are up to 11 standard drinks in a week for women and up to 17 standard drinks in a week for men. Drinks should be spaced out over the week, with two to three alcohol free days per week.

Learn more about low-risk alcohol limits here.

Q3. What counts as hazardous drinking?

Correct

While all of the above could be considered dangerous behaviour, the HSE defines hazardous drinking as drinking more than the low risk levels of alcohol consumption. The low risk levels are up to 11 standard drinks in a week for women and up to 17 standard drinks in a week for men.

According to the HSE harmful drinking is when a person drinks over the low risk weekly amount and has experienced mental or physical health problems directly related to alcohol.

Incorrect

While all of the above could be considered dangerous behaviour, the HSE defines hazardous drinking as drinking more than the low risk levels of alcohol consumption. The low risk levels are up to 11 standard drinks in a week for women and up to 17 standard drinks in a week for men.

According to the HSE harmful drinking is when a person drinks over the low risk weekly amount and has experienced mental or physical health problems directly related to alcohol.

Q4. What is binge drinking?

Correct

Binge drinking is drinking at least six standard drinks on one drinking occasion and is especially dangerous to your health and wellbeing. Drinks should be spaced out over the week, not consumed in one sitting.

Learn more about binge drinking here.

Incorrect

Binge drinking is drinking at least six standard drinks on one drinking occasion and is especially dangerous to your health and wellbeing. Drinks should be spaced out over the week, not consumed in one sitting.

Learn more about binge drinking here.

Q5. How many litres of pure alcohol- i.e. concentrated alcohol without any other liquids or ingredients- are consumed by Irish people over 15 per year on average?

Correct

In 2018 each Irish person over the age of 15 consumed 11.01 litres of pure alcohol on average. This is a decrease on the 2001 figure which was 14.3 litres. The World Health Organisation says that Ireland had the second highest rate of binge drinking in the world in 2014.

Learn more about alcohol here.

Incorrect

In 2018 each Irish person over the age of 15 consumed 11.01 litres of pure alcohol on average. This is a decrease on the 2001 figure which was 14.3 litres. The World Health Organisation says that Ireland had the second highest rate of binge drinking in the world in 2014.

Learn more about alcohol here.

Q6. Which of these drinks has the highest concentration of alcohol?

Correct

Gin has the highest concentration of alcohol. It is usually over 35% alcohol by volume (ABV). Wine is usually between 9% and 14% ABV unless it is fortified. Beer, cider and alcopops are usually between 3% and 6% ABV, although can be higher. You can read the ABV on the bottle or can. If you are in a bar it is usually on the beer tap, on the drinks menu or you can ask the bar staff.

Incorrect

Gin has the highest concentration of alcohol. It is usually over 35% alcohol by volume (ABV). Wine is usually between 9% and 14% ABV unless it is fortified. Beer, cider and alcopops are usually between 3% and 6% ABV, although can be higher. You can read the ABV on the bottle or can. If you are in a bar it is usually on the beer tap, on the drinks menu or you can ask the bar staff.

Q7. How many alcoholic drinks can you safely have before driving?

Correct

Even one drink can impair driving. By law, learner drivers, novice drivers and professional drivers can legally have up to 20 mg blood alcohol concentration. Other drivers can have up to 50 mg of blood alcohol concentration. However, any alcohol in your blood can affect your driving.

Read more about drink driving here.

Incorrect

Even one drink can impair driving. By law learner drivers, novice drivers and professional drivers can legally have up to 20 mg blood alcohol concentration. Other drivers can have up to 50 mg of blood alcohol concentration. However, any alcohol in your blood can affect your driving.

Read more about drink driving here.

Q8. True or false: Chronic alcohol-related conditions will only affect you later in life.

Correct

Chronic alcohol-related conditions are becoming increasingly common among young age groups. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) rates are increasing rapidly in Ireland and the greatest level of increase is among 15-to-34-year-olds, who historically had the lowest rates of liver disease.

Learn more about the effects of alcohol on younger people here.

Incorrect

Chronic alcohol-related conditions are becoming increasingly common among young age groups. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) rates are increasing rapidly in Ireland and the greatest level of increase is among 15-to-34-year-olds, who historically had the lowest rates of liver disease.

Learn more about the effects of alcohol on younger people here.

Q9. How many hospital beds are occupied each day by people with alcohol related problems in Ireland?

Correct

Every day in Ireland 1,500 hospital beds are occupied by people with alcohol related problems.

Incorrect

Every day in Ireland 1,500 hospital beds are occupied by people with alcohol related problems.

Q10. According to the World Health Organisation how much does the risk of suicide when a person is currently abusing alcohol increase by?

Correct

According to the World Health Organisation the risk of suicide increases by eight when someone is currently abusing alcohol.

Learn more about alcohol and mental health here.

Incorrect

According to the World Health Organisation the risk of suicide increases by eight when someone is currently abusing alcohol.


Learn more about alcohol and mental health here.

So, how did you do?

You have completed 0 of 10 questions. Please complete them all.

You know a bit about alcohol, but there’s probably more you could learn. Have a look at our alcohol section to learn more.

You know a bit about alcohol, but there’s probably more you could learn. Have a look at our alcohol section to learn more.

Well done. You know a moderate amount about alcohol, but there’s probably more you could learn. Have a look at our alcohol section to learn more.

Well done. You know a lot about alcohol but have a look at our alcohol section to see what else you might learn.


Published Novem­ber 15th2019
Can this be improved? Contact editor@spunout.ie if you have any suggestions for this article.

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